Posts for category: Dental Procedures

By The Foundry Dental Center
January 14, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dentures  
QuizTestYourKnowledgeonDentures

Since as many as 26 percent of older U.S. adults have lost all their teeth, there are a large number Americans who wear full removable dentures, also known as false teeth. You may be one of them.

How much do you know about dentures? See if you can answer the following questions connected with lost teeth and dentures.

  1. Which word refers to the loss of all permanent teeth?
    1. Atrophy
    2. Prosthetic
    3. Edentulism
    4. Periodontal
  2. What is the name given to the bone that surrounds, supports, and connects to your teeth?
    1. Periodontal
    2. Metacarpal
    3. Tibia
    4. Alveolar
  3. What tissue attaches the teeth to the bone that supports your teeth?
    1. Periodontal Ligament
    2. Periodontal Muscle
    3. Parietal Ligament
    4. Achilles Tendon
  4. When a person loses teeth, the stimulus that keeps the underlying bone healthy is also lost, and the bone resorbs or melts away. Pressure transmitted by dentures through the gums to the bone can accentuate this process, which is called
    1. Dystrophy
    2. Atrophy
    3. Hypertrophy
    4. None of the above
  5. A device that replaces a missing body part such as an arm or leg, eye, tooth or teeth is referred to as
    1. Robotic
    2. Imaginary
    3. Exotic
    4. Prosthetic
  6. When teeth have to be extracted, bone loss can be minimized by bone grafting. Bone grafting materials are usually a sterile powdered form of
    1. Allograft (human tissue)
    2. Xenograft (animal tissue)
    3. Both
    4. Neither
  7. Wearers of full dentures must re-learn to manipulate the jaw joints, ligaments, nerves, and muscles to work differently in order to speak, bite, and chew. The name for this system of interconnected body mechanisms, originating with the root words for “mouth” and “jaw,” is
    1. Boca biting
    2. Stomatognathic
    3. Periodontal
    4. None of the above
  8. A type of plastic that is artistically formed and colored to make prosthetic teeth and gums look natural is called
    1. methyl methacrylate
    2. beta barbital
    3. rayon
    4. polystyrene
  9. Success in denture wearing depends on
    1. The skill of the dentist
    2. The talent of the laboratory technician
    3. The willing collaboration of the patient
    4. All of the above

Answers: 1c, 2d, 3a, 4b, 5d, 6c, 7b, 8a, 9d. How well did you do? If you have additional questions about full removable dentures, don’t hesitate to ask us.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about dentures. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor article, “Removable Full Dentures.”

By The Foundry Dental Center
December 30, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
SpiceUpYourTeeth

As a member of the best-selling pop group Spice Girls, Mel C (AKA Sporty Spice) enjoyed her share of musical superstardom. At the band’s peak in the Nineties, the young singer’s signature look featured baggy sweatpants, an assortment of tattoos, a nose stud and a gold-capped incisor, front and center in her mouth. Today, Melanie Chisholm is still singing — but now she’s a mom, an amateur triathlete… and that gold tooth is just a memory. Not only that, her smile looks more evenly spaced and whiter than it did when she was referred to as the “tomboy” of the group.

What happened? In our view, it all boils down to changing tastes — plus a little bit of help from dental professionals. As the “wannabe” singer proves, there’s no single standard when it comes to making your teeth look their best. Your own look is unique to you — and your smile can reflect that individuality.

For example, crowns (caps) are substantial coverings that may be placed on teeth when they are being restored. They are available in three types: gold, all-porcelain, or porcelain-fused-to-metal. The latter two are tooth-colored, while the gold is — well, shiny like gold bling. Which one is right for you? In many cases, it’s your choice.

Likewise, dental veneers — wafer-thin shells that can correct cosmetic issues by covering the surface of your teeth — can be made in a variety of shades. Their hues may range from natural ivory to Hollywood white, and everything in between. What’s the best color for you? Only you can say.

Some people opt for a “smile makeover” that uses small irregularities in the spacing and color of teeth to create a more “natural” look. Other folks want a perfectly even, brilliant white smile that dazzles the eye. Still others are looking to match or restore the smile they once had — perhaps even re-creating a signature gap between the teeth. As long as there are no other dental issues involved, the choice is yours.

So if you’re unhappy with your smile — or if you feel it doesn’t reflect the person you “wannabe” — why not talk to us about a smile makeover? Just call our office to schedule a consultation. You can learn more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Beautiful Smiles by Design” and “The Impact of a Smile Makeover.”

By The Foundry Dental Center
October 20, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: laser dentistry  
TheLaserRevolutionisChangingtheDentalHealthcare

Lasers have transformed our everyday lives, especially in healthcare. These intense beams of light of a single wavelength have revolutionized all manner of diagnostics and treatments, from general surgery to cosmetic therapy.

Dentistry has also been influenced by the laser revolution. Here are just a few of the areas where they’re growing in use and popularity.

Early disease detection. Laser instruments can take advantage of “fluorescence,” the tendency of bacteria to “glow” when exposed to certain wavelengths of light. This is proving more effective in detecting early tooth decay in pits and fissures (very tiny areas in a tooth’s biting surface) than traditional needle-like probing instruments called dental explorers. Newer lasers can now detect the same fluorescent qualities in soft tissues, which may reduce the detection time for oral cancer and make the difference between life and death.

Dental caries treatment. Lasers have become an alternative to the dental drill in treating teeth with dental caries (decay). Although with larger cavities lasers are somewhat slower than the conventional drill, they truly shine when it comes to early enamel caries and small cavities because they can be quite precise in the amount of tooth structure they remove. This feature allows them to be less invasive than a dental drill.

Periodontal treatment. Periodontal (gum) disease is an infection caused mainly by bacterial plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits) that have adhered to tooth surfaces. Lasers are emerging as an alternative to conventional periodontal (gum) surgery to treat voids or spaces below the gum line called periodontal pockets that have formed because of gum tissue detachment as supporting bone is lost. With their ability to target and destroy infected tissue without damaging nearby healthy tissue, lasers can achieve similar outcomes as traditional techniques but with less tissue damage and discomfort to patients afterward.

Research and development into laser technology continues to perfect these and other applications that promise to make dental procedures less invasive and more comfortable for patients.

If you would like more information on the use of lasers in dentistry, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By The Foundry Dental Center
September 16, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Untagged


mens health monthArchived dental articles from the Academy of General Dentistry and Journal of Periodontology have suggested that men are less likely to adhere to preventative dental care at home. We hope it’s improved in recent years, and since June National Men’s Health Month, we are taking this time to remind all men that oral health is important to overall health.
 
Oral Health and Its Connection to Overall Health
The mouth-body connection is a popular discussion, and studies are starting to see a relationship between gum disease and diabetes, heart disease and pregnancy.
  • Diabetes and oral health – inflammation in the mouth (due to bacteria infecting the gum tissue) has been linked to how the body controls blood sugar.
  • Heart disease and oral health – it’s suspected that gum disease plays a direct role in raising the risk of heart disease.
  • Pregnancy and oral health – researchers speculate that inflammation of the mouth related to infection can possibly affect the development of a fetus in the womb.
 
What Does At-Home Care Do for You? 
At-home dental care is your battle strategy against the enemy formally known as plaque bacteria. With a toothbrush and floss as weapons, it’s much easier to remove bacteria before it forms into plaque and tartar. Buildup breaks down the enamel, increasing the risk of cavities. And cavities can lead to gingivitis and gum disease.
 
Without at-home dental care, these issues can easily arise, but an oral hygiene regimen puts a stop to these problems before they start. If tooth decay isn’t prevented, then that’s when you seek the care of a dentist.
 
Check On Your Oral Health This June at Our Bessemer Dental Practice
If you don’t have an annual dental checkup scheduled, you should. Bi-annual visits will keep you motivated and on task when it comes to your oral health. If you don’t seek a dentist’s advice and preventative treatment, you could be risking more problems and advanced dental treatment down the road.
 
Call us to find out what openings we have this month and in July. It’s better to get your exam out of the way before summer vacation ends!
 
Do you have a dental concern? Call our Bessemer dentist office, The Foundry Dental Center, for an exam. 
By The Foundry Dental Center
September 09, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
MarthaStewartShowsOffRenovationWork-InHerMouth

Martha Stewart has built a flourishing career by showcasing the things she’s designed and made — like floral arrangements, crafts, and even home renovations. Just recently, she was showing off her latest restoration project: a new dental bridge. In fact, she live-tweeted the procedure from her dentist’s office… and she even included pictures of the bridgework before it was placed on her teeth!

OK, it’s a departure from paper crafts and home-made pillows… but why not? We can’t help feeling that there’s just as much craftsmanship — even artistry — in dental bridgework as there is in many other custom-made items. If you learn a little more about what goes into making and placing bridgework, perhaps you’ll understand why we feel that way.

Bridgework is one good solution to the problem of missing teeth (another is dental implants). A fixed bridge is anchored to existing teeth on either side of the gap left by missing teeth, and it uses those healthy teeth to support one or more lifelike replacement teeth. How does it work?

Fabricated as a single unit, the bridge consists of one or more crowns (caps) on either end that will be bonded or cemented to the existing teeth, plus a number of prosthetic teeth in the middle. The solid attachment of the crowns to the healthy teeth keeps the bridge in place; they support the artificial teeth in between, and let them function properly in the bite.

Here’s where some of the artistry comes in: Every piece of bridgework is custom-made for each individual patient. It matches not only their dental anatomy, but also the shape and shade of their natural teeth. Most bridges are made in dental laboratories from models of an individual’s teeth — but some dental offices have their own mini-labs, capable of fabricating quality bridgework quickly and accurately. No matter where they are made, lifelike and perfect-fitting bridges reflect the craftsmanship of skilled lab technicians using high-tech equipment.

Once it is made, bridgework must be properly placed on your teeth. That’s another job that requires a combination of art and science — and it’s one we’re experts at. From creating accurate models of your mouth to making sure the new bridge works well with your bite, we take pride in the work we do… and it shows in your smile.

If you would like more information about dental bridges, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Fixed vs. Removable Bridges” and “Dental Implants vs. Bridgework.”